Foster Homes

Foster Homes

 So why do we need foster homes?  There are at least three reasons.  The primary reason is for dogs coming out of a home who need a new home.    A second reason is that some of the really shy dogs need some help adjusting to the big world before they are ready to be adopted (although we do have a few adopters who love working with the shy dogs, they usually have a full house).  A third reason is to make room for dogs coming in from the track.

Fostering may last for a few days or a few months.  While we make every attempt to adopt dogs in foster homes quickly, it’s not something that we can predict. There are also long-term foster opportunities for special needs greyhounds (a senior or a greyhound with a medical issue).

  • Ideally, a foster home has one person at home most of the time or less than a full work day.  But this is flexible, particularly for a returning dog that is used to being alone during much of the work day.
  • Room to crate or x-pen the foster dog at first while you are not home.
  • Your greyhound(s) and other dogs need to be tolerant of new dogs.  All dogs must be up-to-date with their vaccines.
  • You can opt to pay for the foster’s food and miscellaneous expenses, or GFFL will provide food.  GFFL will cover any veterinary costs and provide heartworm medication.
  • We’d like you to do some basic training – house training, basic manners – the same kind of things that you did with your greyhound when she joined your home.
  • The majority of the greyhounds that we bring in untested are not good with small animals.  Because the cat-safe dogs are adopted more quickly (we usually have people waiting for them), we will need more homes that do not have cats and small dogs.  But we will also need homes with cats or small dogs for the returns that have lived with small animals.  It’s a way to prevent them from becoming NOT safe with small animals.
  • Last and most important, you must share your love.

Fostering may last for a few days or a few months.  While we make every attempt to adopt dogs in foster homes quickly, it’s not something that we can predict. There are also long-term foster opportunities for special needs greyhounds (a senior or a greyhound with a medical issue).

What are the down sides of fostering?  Probably the major one is having to give the dog to the new adopter, especially when you’ve had it for a long period of time.  The good part is that you will have an opportunity to talk with a potential adopter and provide input regarding the match.  This will also enable you to stay in touch with the new home and get photos and updates.  We guarantee that fostering a greyhound will be one of the most rewarding things you’ve ever done!

CIMG4570If you are interested, please contact Barbara Judson at 510-525-3844 or bajudson@gmail.com.  Barbara or one of our experienced fosters will talk to about your home set-up, your schedule, your family, your pets, and any special considerations.  If you’re a fit, you’ll be added to our fostering list.

2017-08-23T14:27:19+00:00 April 15th, 2014|Volunteer|